Doris Arnold | Nocatee Real Estate, Ponte Vedra Real Estate, St. Johns Real Estate

What does it take to generate interest in your home from the right homebuyers at the right time? Marketing is paramount, and using all of the marketing tools at your disposal will make it easier for any home seller to connect with prospective homebuyers consistently. Today, many high-quality marketing tools are readily available to home sellers, including: 1. Social Media Facebook and other social networks now empower home sellers to share details about their residences with homebuyers from around the world. Furthermore, social media is free and easy to use, making it a powerful tool to add to your home selling arsenal. Social media, of course, only ranks as an effective marketing tool if you understand how to leverage it properly. For instance, you'll want to include high-resolution photos of your home with any social media content. You also will want to respond to homebuyers' questions quickly as these queries are posted on social networks, as this may help your home stand out in a crowded real estate market. 2. Virtual Tours Imagine what it would be like if a homebuyer could take a walk through your home even if he or she were many miles away. Thanks to virtual tours, home sellers are able to offer homebuyers a distinct home showing experience, one that is sure to make a long-lasting impression. Before you set up a virtual tour, be sure to consult with a real estate agent. This professional will be able to help you stage your home properly and ensure it looks great to any prospective homebuyer during a virtual home showing. 3. Email Updates Work with your real estate agent to ensure your home is included in any email blasts that he or she sends out. By doing so, you'll be able to maximize your marketing reach and ensure that many homebuyers can learn about your residence immediately. Any email notification should include relevant information for recipients. Therefore, you should ensure that information about your home is included only in email blasts that go to homebuyers who are likely to be interested in your residence. For example, an email blast that is sent to luxury homebuyers should not include information about a tiny house that is now available, as this residence is unlikely to generate significant interest. On the other hand, highlighting your two-bedroom house in an email update sent to first-time homebuyers and small families may be ideal. By doing so, you may improve your home's chances of garnering substantial attention from homebuyers without delay. The home selling process continues to evolve, and thanks to best-in-class technologies, home sellers possess advanced tools they can use to showcase their residences at all times. Discover the benefits of first-rate technologies and be sure to use them as part of your home marketing efforts. With these tools, you'll be better equipped to accentuate the positives of your residence to homebuyers globally and boost your chances of obtaining multiple competitive offers for your house as well.

After you accept a homebuyer's offer on your residence, he or she likely will complete a home inspection. Then, the homebuyer may choose to move forward with the home purchase, rescind or modify his or her offer or ask the home seller to complete home improvements.

Ultimately, a home seller is likely to have many questions following a home inspection, including:

1. What did the homebuyer discover during the home inspection?

As a home seller, it is important to do everything possible to enhance your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can boost your chances of generating substantial interest in your house. Plus, when a homebuyer performs a home inspection, he or she is unlikely to find any problems that may slow down the home selling process.

An informed home seller may conduct a home appraisal prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This appraisal enables a home seller to identify potential trouble areas within a residence and explore ways to address such problems.

If you failed to perform a home appraisal, there is no need to worry. For home sellers, it is important to see a home inspection as a learning opportunity. And if a homebuyer identifies problems with your residence during a home inspection, you should try to work with him or her to resolve these issues.

2. Should I stand my ground after a home inspection?

Be realistic after a home inspection, and you'll be able to make the best decision about how to proceed.

For example, a home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty may address major home problems prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This home seller will dedicate the necessary time and resources to correct home problems and ensure a homebuyer is able to purchase a top-notch residence.

But what happens if a homebuyer identifies problems during a home inspection, despite the fact that a home seller already tried to correct various home issues?

A home seller should consider the homebuyer's inspection report findings closely. If minor home repairs are needed, he or she may be able to fix these problems to move forward with a home sale. Or, if a homebuyer is making exorbitant demands, a home seller may feel comfortable allowing the homebuyer to walk away from a home sale.

3. How should I proceed after a home inspection?

A home inspection can be stressful for both a home seller and a homebuyer. After the home inspection is completed, both parties will be better equipped than ever before to make informed decisions.

If a homebuyer encounters many problems with a residence, he or she will let the home seller know about these issues. Then, a home seller can complete assorted home repairs, offer a discounted price on a home or refuse to perform the requested home maintenance.

Working with a real estate agent is ideal for a home seller, particularly when it comes to home inspections. A real estate agent will negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf and ensure you streamline the home selling process.

Selling a home for the first time can be tricky. In fact, first-time home sellers often make mistakes that prolong the home selling process. Perhaps even worse, these errors may cause a home seller to miss out on opportunities to optimize the value of his or her residence.

Now, let's take a look at three common mistakes that first-time home sellers make, as well as ways to avoid these problems.

1. Setting an Unrealistic Initial Asking Price

Although you might have paid a hefty sum for your house a few years ago, what your home was worth then is unlikely to match its current value. However, if you set an unrealistic initial asking price for your residence, you risk alienating dozens of potential buyers.

Before you set a price for your house, it pays to perform plenty of housing market research. That way, you can see how your home stacks up against the competition and price it based on the current real estate sector's conditions.

Furthermore, you may want to conduct a home appraisal prior to listing your house. Following a home appraisal, you'll receive a property valuation to help you establish a competitive price for your residence.

2. Failing to Provide Full Details About Your House

No home is perfect, and a home seller who withholds information about his or her residence risks wasting precious time and resources. To better understand why this may be the case, let's consider an example.

If a home seller fails to include information about a faulty heating and cooling system in a home listing, a buyer will be unaware of the problem. A buyer then may submit an offer on this house that a seller accepts. But during a home inspection, a property inspector likely will discover the defective heating and cooling system, which leads the buyer to rescind his or her offer. And at this point, the seller will have to restart the home selling process from square one.

When it comes to selling a home, it helps to be honest. If you provide full details about your residence, you can help a buyer make an informed decision and reduce the risk of that a purchase agreement will fall apart after a home inspection.

3. Choosing an Ineffective Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent should have a seller's best interests in mind. As such, this housing market professional will collaborate with a seller throughout the home selling journey to ensure a seller can optimize his or her earnings.

Unfortunately, not all real estate agents possess the same skills. But if you evaluate a variety of real estate agents, you can increase the likelihood of finding one who matches or exceeds your expectations.

Employ a real estate agent with a proven reputation. And if you're uncertain about whether a real estate agent can help you achieve your home selling goals, it usually helps to request client referrals from this housing market professional.

Streamline the process of selling your home – avoid the aforementioned first-time home seller mistakes, and you can boost your chances of enjoying a quick, profitable home selling experience.